This page is maintained for older versions of Spira only. The latest documentation can be found at: https://spiradoc.inflectra.com

Spira 4.2 User Manual Help Viewer

1. Introduction
2. Functionality Overview
3. User/Project Management
4. Requirements Management
5. Test Case Management
6. Incident Tracking
7. Release Management
8. Task Tracking
9. Resource Tracking
10. Document Management
11. Reports Center
12. Source Code
13. Planning Board
14. Mobile Access
Search:
1. Introduction
2. Functionality Overview
3. User/Project Management
4. Requirements Management
5. Test Case Management
6. Incident Tracking
7. Release Management
8. Task Tracking
9. Resource Tracking
10. Document Management
11. Reports Center
12. Source Code
13. Planning Board
14. Mobile Access

5.1. Test Case List

When you click on the Testing > Test Cases link on the global navigation bar, you will initially be taken to the test case list screen illustrated below:

The test case list consists of a hierarchical arrangement of the various test folders and test cases that the system being developed needs to be able to demonstrate. The structure is very similar to the folder structure in Microsoft Windows® Explorer, and users will find this very familiar and intuitive to use. When you create a new project, this list will initially be empty, and you will have to use the <Insert> button to start adding test folders and test cases to the system.

The list consists of test folders shown with a folder icon and in bold-type, and test cases that are shown with a document icon and a hyperlink. You can nest test folders and test cases under an existing test folder, but you cannot nest anything under a test case. All of the items in the list have a name, together with the most recent execution status (passed, failed or not-run), and owner, author, execution date, active flag and test case number. Clicking on a test case’s hyperlink will take you to the test case details page for the item in question (see section 5.2).

It is important to understand that only test cases are assigned a status themselves; the test folders instead display a test execution bar graph that illustrates the aggregate execution status of its child test-cases. Thus if the test folder contains two test cases, one of which passed, and one of which wasn’t run, the graph will display 50% green and 50% gray.

To determine the exact aggregate test folder execution status information, position the mouse pointer over the bar-chart, and the number of tests in each of the execution statuses (passed, failed, not-run, blocked, caution) will be displayed as a “tooltip”. Note that if you change the owner of a test folder, then all the child test cases will be assigned the same owner. This allows you to more easily associate entire folders to test cases to be executed by a specific user.